Finding Easter Hope When You’re Flatlined by Life

Special thanks to my friend and fellow blogger Christi Perry of LearningToBeFearless.org for sharing here today. I hope her heartfelt story and challenge encourages you.

Guest post by Christi Perry

I stood in a dark room side by side with my sister and two of my friends. I was unaware of what they were doing as my eyes were closed.

The thing that captivated me was the bass drum. The music was so loud it vibrated my body— more importantly, my heart.

As I was driving home, several weeks ago, the same thing happened as I listened to a song. I was captivated with the bass drum. I finally had the courage to ask God for something again. It may seem like it’s not that big of a deal. People ask God for things every day. Yes, but I had stopped asking God for things.

I want to explain: I understand prayer’s a dialogue back and forth. God is not my genie that I expect Him to grant me all my wishes. However, He also says to come to Him and to ask, seek and knock. But the past few times I really asked, I received the opposite of what I asked for…

I asked God to save my Dad… And seven days later, my Dad passed away.

When Our Physical Hearts Stop Beating

Life can feel like it’s tearing you a part. There can be really great moments and down right awful ones. It’s easy to see God in the great ones and difficult to see him in the awful ones.

There’s an unseen enemy trying to tear us apart. But, there’s also an understanding problem because I am a finite being in relationship with an infinite being. His scope is so much more broad than my failing eyes can see.

In the past two years, I felt like my heart was laid open as it’s been picked, pulled and ripped to shreds by circumstances: failed relationships, the loss of jobs, the loss of purpose, the loss of a place I called my own, the loss of my Dad.

In life, sometimes our physical hearts can stop beating, which is why AEDs (Automated External Defibrillators) were invented. Most of us have seen paramedics use an AED to shock someone back to life.  As I thought about this, I thought of my heart in an emotional and spiritual sense. If our physical heart can stop beating, who is to say that our emotional and spiritual heart can’t stop beating as well?

What Can Revive Our Silent Hearts

But what’s our spiritual AED? The cross. It’s the battle cry that death has been defeated, that something shocking and gruesome would bring life. AEDs, if not used in the right circumstance, could cause death. Had Jesus not been the perfect sacrifice, his death would have resulted is nothing but death. But the perfection of Jesus and the wrath of God being satisfied for all mankind resulted in resurrection.

Before I continue, I want you to listen to a song. And when you get to minute 3:53, listen to the bass drum.

I don’t know what your Easter looks like this year. Maybe it looks like an empty seat next to you due to death or divorce. Maybe it looks like the last pew because your life has been turned upside down and you’ve had to relocate and you’re new. Maybe it looks like a morning home alone because you’ve been burned by the church. Whatever your Easter looks like, listen to this song. And pay close attention to the bass drum.

As, I hear the bass drum, I can almost picture God shocking us back to Him.

Wherever You Are This Easter

So, this Easter, wherever you are in life,  know that God the Father didn’t only send Jesus to save us for eternity. He sent Jesus to revive us.

Revive means making alive, keeping alive, and giving more life.

You who have shown me many troubles and distresses will revive me again, And will bring me up again from the depths of the earth. (Psalm 71:20)

Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, And Your right hand will save me. (Psalm 138:7)

God sent Jesus so that we have someone in our corner. He knows our hurts. We are not unseen. Hebrews 7:25 says, “He lives to make intercessions for us.” I cannot fathom that. Exodus 14:14 also promises, “The Lord will fight for you, you only need to be still.”

Rest assured that no matter what your Easter looks like this year, you’re held, fought for, and can be revived by the Author and Perfecter of life who overcame death on our behalf.

 

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Revolutionary Love

Love perseveres in spite of obstacles. Love gives without any guarantee of receiving. Love sacrifices until it hurts and then sacrifices some more.

If I told you those themes are part of my latest novel, you might guess I’m a romance writer, right? Well, they are, but guess again. The Revolutionary is a dystopia.

Wait. Dystopia? You mean one of those futuristic novels so dark they make the problems of our own world look like a walk in the park? Yes and no. Though dystopian novels have certain bleak characteristics, I think that setting paints the perfect contrast to the hope characters are fighting (and sometimes dying) to gain.

How can a dystopia present an accurate view of love? I’m glad you asked.

#1 – Love perseveres in spite of obstacles.

Obstacles are everywhere in dystopian novels, and The Revolutionary is no exception. The first chapter in this sequel to The Revisionary opens with my heroine Portia in a satellite slave camp where prisoners die like rabbits, and no one cares—no one but Portia’s protector Gath. Whether he’s trying to shield her from the freezing wind or take a lash for her, he selflessly destroys his own health to preserve hers.

As a result, Portia struggles with guilt. Surely, he has already done enough for her. How can she ever repay him? But then, there are those horrible rumors about Gath. Does he feel he owes her a debt because the accusations are true?

But that’s the thing. Love doesn’t keep score. Whether or not Gath is as guilty as people say, Portia resolves to rescue him and the other prisoners.

#2 – Love gives without any guarantee of receiving.

When a spy ringmaster helps her escape the satellite, Portia could try to run and get her life back. But the reality is that without her new role as a plant inside the capital of Crystal, her brother and friends won’t have any chance of learning why the ruling Dome wants to execute prisoners in mass.

Plus, unless she takes this job, she’ll never learn if her long-time friend Luther is on her side and cares about her the way she does for him. But when she sees him again for the first time in months, her blood curdles. He keeps company with the ruling echelons, the very people who want her dead.

They seem stuck on two different ends of a pendulum, never knowing when their paths will cross and if they have the same motives. Yet they desire the other’s good, even when they don’t know what that will mean for them.

#3 – Love sacrifices until it hurts and then sacrifices some more.

When God reaches into someone’s life, He can transform even the cruelest person into a new creation. In Acts 9, the Bible tells the true story of the transformation of persecutor Saul into the Apostle Paul.

Gath’s character arc in some ways parallels that of Paul. His faith enables him to love others—even his tormentors—in a way few people understand.

And though he’s merely a shell of his old self, he volunteers for a one-way mission, even when he finally has a chance at his own happy ending.

True love is sacrificial, not thinking of its own interests but of “the interests of others” (Philippians 2:4 ESV).

Closing thought

Whew, heavy stuff, right? I didn’t say dystopias are all sunshine and roses, but even they can present a beautiful, though battered, representation of what true love looks like.

Maybe you’re thinking, “That’s all well and good for make-believe, but that’s not real life.” If fiction doesn’t mirror real life, then there’s no point in reading it.

Besides, real life offers its own examples. Just look through the Bible for story after story of sacrificial love in action.

  • Jonathan willingly gave up his right to the throne for his friend David.
  • Ruth turned her back on her own people to care for her mother-in-law.
  • Esther faced the king on behalf of her people at the risk of her own life.
  • The Apostle Paul endured unspeakable torture for the gospel’s sake.
  • Then, there is the ultimate example, Jesus, who died on the cross for thankless sinners.

Sure, there are many failures in Scripture as well, but I find those examples encouraging, too. (And trust me, my characters make their fair share of mistakes.) However, through mistakes, we can discover second chances. In spite of past hurts, we can learn to love well.

Now that’s a revolutionary view of love.

~ Kristen

I’m grateful that this post first appeared on Christi Perry’s blog Not Born Fearless, which offers an honest, transparent look at dealing with fear and uncertainty in everyday life. 

 

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