3 Reasons to Thank Dad on Father’s Day

To most, the man across the table from me is nothing but an old broken Tooler with knobby fingers and dirty nails. To me, he is everything left that’s kind and lovely in the world. – Portia, The Revisionary

At the beginning of The Revisionary, Portia and her father Abram Abernathy only have each other, but she’s made a plan to get back her lost brother. She thinks that if she can earn a Revisionary seat in the ruling Dome, she can rescue him from the satellite where the ASU government banished him.

Although her father calls her plan “a fool’s errand,” she is sure of one thing: he loves her, whether or not he agrees with her ideas. Truthfully, she doesn’t understand his own or the secret work that often takes him away from home.

As she embarks on her own journey, she comes to respect her father’s wisdom and realizes that all along, he’s had her best interests at heart.

You see, there are several lessons in tough love fathers teach their children, all of which help prepare them for adulthood.

#1: Dads let children make their own mistakes and learn from them.

My brave girl’s quest is a fool’s errand, but I’m proud of her spirit. – Abram Abernathy

Moms are nurturers. Fathers are providers. Moms have a momma-bear-protection instinct, but dads want to see their kids get dirty and learn to pick themselves back up. Sure, there are some things in life dads hope their children will never have to face, but dads also recognize that experience can be an effective teacher.

Abram may not want Portia to leave home, but he doesn’t stop her. Instead, he tries to prepare her for what might lie ahead.

#2: Dads teach children about the future and how to prepare for it.

“It’s more than the blade. It’s the responsibility that comes with it.” – Abram Abernathy

Before Portia leaves home, her father presents her with a gift: a small karambit blade to carry with her for protection.

Perhaps your dad taught you self-defense and how to shoot. (If he did, all the better!) If not, maybe he showed you how to change a flat tire or balance a checkbook.

Every dad has his own approach, and one isn’t necessarily better than another. As dads see best, they help equip their children for the future.

#3: Dads don’t pretend to know all the answers but give guidance for the journey.

“You do the next right thing, Portia, and then the next right thing after that. You’ll find your way.” – Abram Abernathy

The older I get, the more I value my parents’ wisdom. Though I’d like to think my dad can solve all my problems, the truth is that he can’t. Still, he knows how to handle a great many more challenges than I do, so I call him and my mom anyway.

I don’t think they mind.

The Heavenly Father

If you’re blessed to have your father in your life, use Father’s Day as an opportunity to thank him for all he does. However, I realize that due to death or circumstances beyond control, many people find Father’s Day a lonely time.

Always remember we have a heavenly Father who loves us and cares for us more than we can possibly imagine. Just think about all God does for His children!

  • He shows compassion toward them (Psalm 103:13).
  • He corrects them, because He delights in them (Proverbs 3:12).
  • He desires to give them good things (Matthew 7:11).

I hope you can call yourself God’s child. If you can’t, I challenge you to get into the Bible, his Word, and discover why a relationship with Him is the most important one you can ever have.

Happy Father’s Day.

~ Kristen

Tweetable

3 Reasons to Thank Dad – @kjhogrefe (Click to Tweet)

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